Programming

For The Love of Eve!

Roughly two months ago, I rekindled my love for Eve. It had been the most exciting thing when I started to play in 2005. I renewed my membership and kept playing when I moved to Toronto in 2008 from Istanbul. After another 3 years, I stopped my Capsuleer experience in 2011 November. So, my character has been in a Cryo pod for almost 4 years. I think I have a better control of my life now so I can afford some free time without feeling guilty but this is not the essence of this article.

4 years is a long time and a lot has changed in Eve. I always liked Manufacturing and other side businesses in this game and I’m now investigating newer ways of making money with more advanced blueprints. One thing I did not have back when I left is that I now know Python so I can utilize it to do the heavy lifting in certain areas. Like finding all the blueprints that use the same raw materials! If I have excess quantity of a certain commodity what other blueprints can be used to spend what I have?

Could this question also be formulated as : If a company has commodity A,B and C; find all the people who have purchased these items and the quantity they did so we can figure out clients’ spending behavior, frequency or whatever. I know people are not blueprints but putting the problem in a familiar context sometimes helps. However, we are going to shop not even online today but offworld. Up we go!

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Programming, Stuff

Measure Twice, Cut Twice

According to general wisdom one should measure twice and cut once. This makes sense in most professions and even generally in life; when you should think twice and open your mouth once. However, again, generally in programming, we have this ++ approach. There was C then C++ came out. Looking at the list of programming languages on Wiki, I can see 8 records with ++ in their names. Not every ++ is related to the programming language it’s named after. For example R++ has nothing to do with R which is a statistical programming language whereas R++ itself is C++ related.

That being said, I’m going to take a naive approach and apply ++ logic to measure twice and cut once and make it measure twice and cut twice.  First and foremost, this is going to be an empirical approach and my basis for this theory is the experience I have gained in 15 years of building static and dynamic websites, web and desktop applications. However, I hope that it’ll make sense to most of you, especially to those who obsess about details and perfectionism.

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Portfolio, Programming

Pythonicus Addendum

Posts in this series
  1. Pythonicus
  2. Pythonicus Addendum
  3. Pythonicus Finitum

In my previous Pythonicus article I briefly talked about my need to parse a list of NoSQL Databases at http://nosql-database.org. My solution back then was as it was presented in that article, using regular expressions to find child and sibling nodes. It was a bit crude but it got the job done.

I’m constantly fighting against the “get’er done” mentality on a daily basis so I’ll try to get the job done right this time by using BeautifulSoup. That’s actually where I left the article off so let’s see how tasty the soup is!

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Portfolio, Programming

Pythonicus

Posts in this series
  1. Pythonicus
  2. Pythonicus Addendum
  3. Pythonicus Finitum

I started to learn Python in May. I finished two introductory courses about it on Coursera. Then, after a summer full of indecisiveness and frustration about where I want to take my skills to, I came to the conclusion that becoming a data scientist would be the right move. I guess that was around the last week of October. Since then, I’ve finished a third Python course and the fourth one is starting pretty soon.

I can already feel that I’ve opened the doors to a whole other world about computing and programming. My feelings about Data Science deserves another article so I’ll only focus on Python in this one. More specifically, how I approached a specific problem and how I’ve been able to produce the same results with better tools.

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Books, Game Design

Review : Introduction to Game Analysis

Every now and often I have a miss in finding the right book for my game design and development work. Sometimes, either I don’t pay attention to the table of contents before I order books from my local public library or the excerpt is not clear enough and I decide to make my decision once I put my hands on it. This is one of those moments but it’s not the reason why I’m mentioning this book by  Clara Fernández-Vara, Introduction to Game Analysis.

That being said, the book is doing a very good job at dissecting the whole “game” into smaller bits described as context and elements. This feels more scientific and formal than what I’ve seen most game journalists do these days. Although I might be wrong, I see little value in reading this book for my game development needs. However, I would strongly recommend this book for anyone who is serious about game journalism or who’s in the academia studying ludology. It’s a bit too formal for my taste and needs. I’d like to share my thoughts in a more casual way.

Portfolio

DigiScore AVP Productions

sangold_1

 

A Kiosk application for DigiScore, an AV production company from Australia. Main goal was to showcase the client’s videos through a pleasant interface. The application is flexible enough to understand images and videos and respect folder structures so the client can organize their content freely. It has virtual keyboard support for people to type in and send emails to the company.

Designed 
Yes
Developed 
Yes
Technologies
Flex, Adobe AIR
No flash installed
Game Design

I’m going Medieval

I still think the best part of being a game designer is the research part. I’ve had this itch of making an RPG game for quite a while. The time has come for me to do research on medieval professions. It’s amazing to see how many occupations have been lost to time and how many of them have survived in one way or another.

I’ll group them by activity names such as Innkeeping, Potion Making, Clothing, Scholar, Smithing, Jewellery Making and General Crafting. The list will hold a name of the profession and a brief description next to it. I’m planning to keep adding as I go so here is the state of the list as of July 27th.

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